All posts by thetimgirard

I am a Colorado composer, interested in writing music for film, television, and games, as well as instrumental and choral music for the concert stage. I have a Master of Music degree in composition from the University of Denver.

Introducing Motor Mouth Podcasting!

My friend Joel and I just launched Motor Mouth Podcasting!
Contact us if you want to start a podcast but don’t have the equipment to record and/or don’t have the time to edit (Joel), or if you want a custom theme composed for your podcast (me).
We also launched our flagship podcast that will be released every-other Wednesday starting January 13th (in case you’ve listened to the Movie Mumble podcast hosted by Nerds That Geek and thought, “I want to hear more of Joel and Tim…”) It will be available on iTunes, Spotify, StitcherAudible, and the Motor Mouth website.
In the meantime you can listen to the trailer, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter

 

 

Thrawn: A Star Wars Fan Film Teaser

Earlier in the Fall, I composed the score (inspired by Thrawn’s original theme from Rebels by Kevin Kiner) to Thrawn: A Star Wars Fan Film Teaser. It was released on YouTube towards the end of November, and then a few days later, The Making of Thrawn: A Star Wars Fan Film was released, which also features my music. It is being created by ACOY Productions, and you can subscribe to their YouTube channel if you want to stay updated on any new releases, and check out their Patreon page if you would like to contribute to the creation of the film.

The Elements: Earth, Water, Fire, Air

At the beginning of October I participated in Video Game Music Academy‘s, 7 Days of VGM. The goal is to “write at least 2-4 bars of new music everyday for 7 days straight.” It starts on the 7th of every month, and October’s theme was “The Elements.” Every day a different element was presented, along with a short phrase to use as a composition prompt:

1. Earth (Song of the Earth Mother)
2. Fire (Burning Destruction)
3. Air (Soaring on the Wind)
4. Water (Peace and Tranquility)
5. Wood (Lost in the Forest)
6. Metal (Forged of Steel)
7. Aether (Mysteries of the Void).

Unfortunately, I got a late start and also had a few other hang-ups throughout the week, so I wasn’t able to do the last three, but at least I was able to finish the first four, more common elements. Originally, I posted them on social media in the order that they were presented by VGM Academy, but here I’ve presented them in “ascending” order: Earth, Water, Fire, Air. I hope you enjoy them!

 

Spitfire Audio | WestWorld Scoring Competition

At the beginning of June, I participated in theSpitfire Audio | WestWorld Scoring Competition  where I had to score a chase scene from season 3 of WestWorld. When I tried to upload it to YouTube, for some reason it had none of my music (maybe because I used YouTube’s new uploader). Since I uploaded it right at the deadline, unfortunately there was no time to fix it. Eventually I did get the version with my music uploaded (using YouTube’s older uploader). I hope you enjoy it!

Projects from the Class I’m Taking

Since the beginning of April, I’ve been auditing the “Computer-Based Media Arranging” class at DU (remotely), taught by David Hanson. Here are the highlights of the assignments that I’ve done so far.

One of our earliest assignments was to write four melodies, based on different situations. Our next assignment was to add harmony to at least one of those melodies.

Melody 1. “A Man on a Bike Finds an Injured Baby Girl Raccoon…” – This was based on a scenario that my wife came up with. “A man is riding a bike… he comes across an injured baby girl raccoon… he gently puts her in his backpack… and races to the animal hospital! She is going to be ok… so he takes her home to live with him.” The solo cello plays two different melodies (one for the man and one for the raccoon) which gradually merge. This was one of my melodies that I added harmony to. I added low string accompaniment below the melody for the man, and high string accompaniment above the melody for the raccoon.

Melody 2. “A Conversation Between a Man and a Computer” – This was a scenario that I thought of, inspired by 2001: A Space Odyssey. Written for piano, I used a 12 tone row, and upon each completion, transposed it up a half-step, to increase tension. The middle voice represents the man: C Major pentatonic, and after the initial note C, the notes spell out D-A-V-E (for the ‘V’ I used the note G which is ‘V’ or ‘5’ in the key of C, so D, A, G, E)  are placed in that order. The notes in the extreme low register are the beginning of the melody of the song “Daisy Bell” in the key of F# (this represents the ‘human side’ or ‘soul’ of the computer. All the other notes of the row are played as fast as possible in the upper register of the piano, short and dry (this represents the machine-like, computational aspect of the computer). I really enjoyed how this worked on its own, so I didn’t add harmony to it.

Melody 3. “Innocence Amidst Danger” – This prompt came from our textbook. “The childish innocence of a mute Indonesian child at play in a dangerous place.” I chose a ‘tuned gongs’ sample library in Kontakt that was able to adjust the notes to Slendro/Pelog tuning. Initially I created a simple melody that playfully explored the notes of the scale. When it came time to add harmony, I added more of the tuned gongs underneath to fill out a little bit more of the gamelan atmosphere.

Melody 4. “A Cat and a Bird” – Another prompt from my wife. A cat wakes up from a nap. It hears a bird outside. The cat stalks the bird, but when the cat attacks, it just scares the bird and it flies away. For the cat, i used an octatonic scale (C, C#, D#, E, F#, G, A, Bb) and the bird is the fully-diminished 7 chord that is the complement of the cats’ octatonic scale (B, D, F, Ab). Again, I was happy with this on its own, so I didn’t add harmony.

Our next assignment was to write a minute-long theme for a contemporary detective show with a heavy backbeat (using the theme song for the show Bosch as an example). My first example was close, but not quite there yet, but after some tweaking (a better drum sample library, a better bass sample library, some better string parts, etc.), I’m much happier with it. Ladies and gentlemen, the next hit streaming series: Detective Backbeat!

Conan vs Zombies

What have I been doing during the “shelter-in-place” you ask? Between bouts of anxiety, I scored Emil Acevedo’s (Virgeo Studios) LEGO stop-motion short film Conan vs Zombies! It is truly a metaphor for our times! You are Conan! Crush the coronavirus! See it driven before you! Hear the lamentations of the coronavirus! While wearing a mask and/or staying home!

I also included the stand-alone score in the media player in case you want to listen to that by itself.

Stranger’s Theme

At Denver Pop Culture Con 2019 I was doing media coverage for Nerds That Geek, and on Sunday evening I attended the panel hosted by Sebastian Jones of Stranger Comics (here is the article), and then bought a bunch of their paperbacks . Once the dust settled from DPCC, I had a chance to read ‘The Untamed’ volumes 1 and 2 and ‘Niobe,’ and I loved them!

What was especially exciting was seeing that there was a ‘Stranger’s Theme’ melody (written by Jens Engelbrecht & Sebastian A. Jones) written out at the beginning of ‘The Untamed: A Sinner’s Prayer’ (volume 1) . I was inspired to write a few arrangements of the theme, and I sent them to Stranger Comics (unsolicited, which is super annoying, I know, but I figured I’d take a chance). My best-case scenario is that they don’t have a composer for the ‘World of Asunda’ HBO show, and they love my work and pick me. Or maybe Sebastian gets a kick out of them and listens to them for inspiration while he’s writing. Or maybe the email never gets opened. Either way, I’m glad I followed my inspiration and have some music to show for it. Speaking of which…

I wanted to be able to share these pieces, but since I didn’t write the melody, I don’t want to make it look like I’m trying to take credit for something that isn’t mine. In the versions that I’ve posted, instead of the actual ‘Stranger’s Theme’ melody, I’ve reduced the melody to just an ascending and descending scale, so that I can still use the chord progressions that I composed (they were not included with the melody in the comic) as well as my orchestrations. I think what’s left is different enough from the source material to be considered “inspired by.”

There are scenes from the comics that I drew inspiration from when I was writing the different sections, but the music doesn’t necessarily follow the story chronologically. The titles I’ve chosen are vague descriptions of the scenes that I had in mind.