Movie Mumble podcast, ‘Drive’

On Sunday, Nerds That Geek posted Episode 26 of the Movie Mumble podcast: Drive. Listen as ZekeJoel, Scott, and I “dive into a motion picture revolving around an unnamed Hollywood stuntman who leads a second life as a getaway driver.” As a prelude, listen to the various themes in the media player.

Everything’s Coming Up Rosies: the musical, Part 1

Back in early 2015, I was the Composer in Residence for Opera Colorado’s Generation OC – Page to Stage program. As part of this program, I worked with the theater department at Elizabeth Middle School. They took the play Everything’s Coming Up Rosies (inspired by Rosie the Riveter) by Christina Hamlett (which takes place during World War II), and turned it into a musical. Here are the first two songs I wrote for their lyrics.

“The Happiest of Happy Days” starts with a group of girls (oboes) laughing and reading their friend’s diary about a cute boy named Frank. After scolding her friends for reading her diary, Vivian (flute) prepares for her wedding to Frank in two weeks. She’s getting butterflies wondering if she should wear her hair up and what she should use for her ‘something blue’ when her father walks her down the aisle in her grandmother’s dress. Nothing could ruin her perfect day!

Frank finds out that he has been drafted and has to leave in three days for basic training. In “I Can’t Say Goodbye to You,” Frank (cello) tells Vivian that he doesn’t want to leave right after getting married. He understands that it is difficult for her, but he has to go. Vivian (flute) tells him that she doesn’t want him to leave before they’ve gotten married. She understands that it is important to him, but she still doesn’t want him to go. What about all of their plans and dreams? Frank tells her that he can’t stay while they’re at war and that he has to do his part to keep her safe. They can get back to their dreams when he comes home, because good things are worth waiting for. He will take her love with him and think of her every day while he is gone. Vivian agrees to let him go, but only if he promises to come back. Frank promises to come back if she will wait for him. She promises to wait for him, and they can finally say goodbye to each other.

Tune in next month for the next two songs!

Movie Mumble podcast, ‘Eyes Without a Face’

On Sunday, Nerds That Geek posted Episode 25 of the Movie Mumble podcast: Eyes Without a Face. In this episode, we are joined by our new, permanent co-host, Zeke (who brought us Bad Times at the El Royale back in February as a guest for a special episode). Listen as ZekeJoel, Scott, and I “break own a classic foreign horror film about a surgeon who will do anything to preserve his daughter’s beauty when she’s badly disfigured in a car crash.” As a prelude, listen to the various themes in the media player.

Music from an Opera about Mummies that was Never Made, or ‘Ramses’ the Stand-Alone Composition

During my undergrad at the University of Rhode Island, I read the book The Mummy or Ramses the Damned by Anne Rice. I had the overly optimistic idea to compose an opera based on the book and began working on some musical themes. For many reasons, the opera never happened (if you know Anne Rice and think she might be interested, give her my info), but I had this short piece to show for it. Originally, it was written for rock band and strings, but I recently rearranged it for rock band, choir, and full orchestra.

Movie Mumble podcast, ‘Fanboys’

On Sunday, Nerds That Geek posted Episode 24 of the Movie Mumble podcast: ‘Fanboys’. Listen as Joel, Scott, and I “dive into a true cult classic, one that explores the power of fandom and one that features the ultimate quest for a group of nerds who are looking to provide their dying friend with the best gift ever.” As a prelude, listen to the various themes in the media player.

Denver Pop Culture Con 2019 Coverage for Nerds That Geek

In addition to being one of the voices of the Movie Mumble podcast, I also write articles for Nerds That Geek, mostly about Denver Pop Culture Con. While I’m attending, my main focus is usually panels, but I also check out venders, artists, other creators, and this year, Movie Mumble recorded a special ‘live’ episode. If you’re interested in checking out any of my coverage, you can read my nerdy checklist written in anticipation of DPCC, listen to our special episode of the  Movie Mumble podcast, check out the list of my Top 10 Vendor Booths, and read the reviews of the three panels I attended: From Script to Screen: How to Make MoviesPitch Perfect: Crafting the Best Book Proposal, and Take an Idea from Concept to Creation – HBO’s Asunda. Oh, and I also met Dan Fogler.

Music from the film ‘Aura’

In the summer of 2017, I scored the short film Aura by Linh Ngo for the Denver 48 Hour Film Project. I recently condensed the music to create a short, stand-alone soundtrack for the film. Here is a synopsis of Aura so you can read along while listening to the music (in the media player).

A woman walks into a board room and puts a gun on one end of the table, and a second gun at the other end. She takes a seat at the middle of the table and adjusts her makeup. When we see her face in the compact mirror, it is in black and white, with a white glow. There is a flashback to a week earlier.

While she is walking outside, she runs into a male friend of hers who she had lost touch with. He confesses to her that he misses having her in his life, and she sees a similar white glow around him. A day later she meets with her female friend and sees the same white glow around her.

Our main character goes to see an oracle, and the oracle tells her that if she sees the color blue in someone’s aura, then that person is her soulmate, but if she sees red in the person’s aura, then that means that she has met her greatest enemy. Our main character has seen both, but doesn’t know which is which because she is colorblind. The oracle gives her a reading and tells her that in a week, she will be together with her soulmate and mortal enemy, and there will be death, but upon death, the aura is so bright that even someone who is colorblind can see its color.

Returning to present day, in the board room, our main character answers the door to first her male friend, and then her female friend. She has them sit at each end of the table, by the guns. She tells them both that her enemy will try to kill her today and that she hopes her soulmate will save her. In an instant, they each pick up a gun and fire! Our main character is unharmed, but she sees that both of her friends have been shot dead… and both are glowing blue. Reeling from the revelation, our main character picks up one of the guns and shoots herself in the heart. As she lies there dying, she sees her face in her compact mirror… and her face is glowing red.

(When I am composing a piece that deals with colors, there is a ‘spectrum scale’ that I use for color associations. For the colors of the auras in this film, I used the note G for the color red, and the note D for the color blue.)

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